Because Results Matter. Contact Us Today For A Free Consultation.
  949-444-5306
Customized Legal Services For Businesses And Individuals

Development Archives

California developers may be watching Senate Bill 330

Many California communities have limitations on what construction projects can happen in their areas. This is true despite a housing crisis here in the state. Recently, state Senator Nancy Skinner introduced a bill that would force these communities to lighten up on their restrictions, which could benefit developers.

Is the mixed-use development here to stay?

In decades past, it seems as though people across the country, including here in California, wanted to keep the different parts of their lives separate. They wanted to live on one area, shop in another and entertain themselves in yet another area. In recent years, that trend has changed, and the mixed-use development may be here to stay.

Some question future development in California wildfire areas

As anyone who has lived here in California for any length of time knows, wildfires could devastate many of the state's residential communities. In the aftermath of recent fires here in the state, some wonder why future development projects are given the green light by government officials. They argue that it's foolhardy to put that many people and homes at risk.

Keeping track of trends helps developers choose projects

What projects could still provide a healthy profit margin here in California? In 2018, a study was done to make that determination. Keeping track of trends by reviewing these types of studies could help developers choose projects that could provide the investment and profits they seek.

Developers consider the costs of 'going green' in construction

Every California resident can do his or her part in protecting the environment. For developers, this could include "going green" when it comes to construction. However, they would more than likely consider the financial benefits of doing so first since some environmentally friendly construction options can be costly.

Developers may need to rethink what an anchor tenant is

Shopping centers, outdoor malls and indoor malls have all traditionally relied on prominent, well-known retail stores to draw customers here in Orange County and elsewhere. Large department stores used to fit the bill when it came to finding anchor tenants for retail developments. As the consumer landscape changes, developers may need to rethink what constitutes an anchor tenant.

Developers may look to boutique industry for new tenants

Consumers here in California can log onto their computers and purchase just about anything from nearly anywhere in the world just like everyone else. This new way of shopping has put a dent into the traditional brick and mortar method, but it has not killed it just yet. Developers may still find tenants for new developments by looking to the boutique industry.

Environmental assessments could prove useful to developers

Real estate purchases have numerous moving parts whether they take place here in California or elsewhere. The due diligence portion of the process could take some time, especially when there are questions regarding the amount of work that may be needed to bring a site up to code. Developers often rely on environmental assessments to let them know what they may be in for when purchasing a certain plot of land.

Easements may play a critical role in a development

When purchasing a piece of property here in Orange County, the parties must undergo a significant amount of due diligence before the transaction may close. A title search is part of that process. If easements are discovered, they could play a critical role in the progression of a development.

WRAP exclusions could cause problems for developers down the road

Insurance coverage is a large part of California construction projects. No one, from developers to subcontractors, wants to be left holding the bag if something goes wrong. With the increase in the use of WRAP exclusions, a general contractor, owner or developer could end up not having access to a subcontractor's insurance coverage if needed.